John B. Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka win the Nobel Peace Prize in Physiology or Medicine for their work on reprogramming stem cells so they can develop into tissues of all parts of the body.

John B. Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka win the Nobel Peace Prize in Physiology or Medicine for their work on reprogramming stem cells so they can develop into tissues of all parts of the body.

Rantings (and hopefully insight) of a student of social science.

There used to be a time when graduating from college meant you were smart. Something about crops and their cream, the knees of bees, and the future of the U.S.’ power.
Now you can barely get a job with a Bachelor’s degree. And when you do, there’s feelings of regression as your employer treats you as they would a high school student. Would you be surprised to hear though that I can’t even blame them?
Lets face it, there’s hardly anything resembling the ideal image of what we were told a college graduate used to be anymore. Because of the recession many of us have been forced to return home to live with our parents, only reinforcing the culture of perpetual childhood. Reality television never fails to remind us that there’s plenty of 20 to 30 year olds that still can’t get their shit together, so why should we feel bad if we can’t get ours together either? And of course social media has given us a wonderful outlet to escape the realities of the world around us, either for a few minutes between priorities at work or for hours while we remain unemployed in bed. I love Generation Y, but we were robbed of our intellect and our unique (but hopefully not last) opportunity to make significant progress in the world.
At the base of this problem, I want to highlight Higher Education. Getting a degree just doesn’t mean shit anymore.

Read More

Why ya’ll need to STFU and remember what a U.S. Democracy is.

For real though, we need a refresher. Some people fell asleep for a good chunk of Civics class and only remember the portion of our nation that involves Democracy. Apparently I’m one of the few that was conscious for the last part of my teacher’s sentence where he said “Republic.” Democratic Republics do two things. Serve the needs of the majority and protect the interests of the minority. Serve the majority. Protect the minority. This means give the majority what they want as long as it’s not at the expense of the minority’s rights or equality. For example, you can encourage people to move into historically poor neighborhoods. As long as it’s not at the expense of forcing poor people out. Or as a majority you can disagree with same sex marriage all you want, but unless it happening is somehow at your expense you can’t reasonably expect it banned. Likewise, economics may tell us that gov’t spending on Public Housing isn’t as free market as tax cuts, but would the latter be at the expense of the minority? Especially the minority that has already been deemed and treated historically as expendable. What I really love about the U.S. is that there was a genuine attempt at making a balanced society where everyone could do virtually whatever they wanted as long as it was at no one’s expense. What we need to remember is that legislation that protects or equals out the life of the minority is not a danger to the majority. Shared power is a Democratic Republic. Shared power is the foundation of the U.S.A.

What? Library Sciences isn’t a paying field?

What? Library Sciences isn’t a paying field?