geoffmullings:

blinkernyc:

“Journeyman’s” Arrest Was a Sad Addition To Problems Many NYers Are Facing

If you haven’t yet heard, something wonderful is happening in Manhattan these days. Someone’s taking time out of what seems to be a norm of social media narcissism, and tracking of pointless statistics and gossip, to show some empathy toward a fellow New Yorker. It’s not unfounded, but it’s especially commendable at a time when many of us choose to mock rather than acknowledge, let alone address the social ills NYC faces.
A young man has chosen to teach a recently unemployed homeless man how to code (more like the homeless man chose to learn how to code, rather than receive a monetary donation). The student’s name is “Journeyman” Leo, he’s been learning to code since late August, and he was arrested Sunday morning by the NYPD for trespassing in a City park (sleeping on a bench past park closing hours), although today he’s free.
The arrest didn’t come without disruption though. In addition to whatever mental stress was incurred by going through the NYPD’s booking and holding process, Leo was unable to meet with his teacher that day and almost missed a media interview about his journey.
It might be a bit cynical to then say “digital coding couldn’t save the homeless guy from reality,” but it honestly didn’t. And the arrest, indeed “Journeyman’s” entire situation, is a sad lesson on how little education and experience helps in fighting today’s deeply entrenched metropolitan social problems….
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Wrote this because Journeyman’s situation so recently proves how vital social mobility is to success.
And the absence of social mobility could seriously stagnate an economy. We’re talking about “culture of despair” type of stagnation, which I’ll be writing about soon too through another story.
But if you want to renew hope for people, give them a chance to consider investing in themselves, if you want people to see themselves having a future, you need social mobility. The kind that overcomes racial and economic discrimination.
The kind that doesn’t let someone drop from a corporate job at Metlife in 2011 to living on the NYC sidewalk in 2013.

geoffmullings:

blinkernyc:

“Journeyman’s” Arrest Was a Sad Addition To Problems Many NYers Are Facing

If you haven’t yet heard, something wonderful is happening in Manhattan these days. Someone’s taking time out of what seems to be a norm of social media narcissism, and tracking of pointless statistics and gossip, to show some empathy toward a fellow New Yorker. It’s not unfounded, but it’s especially commendable at a time when many of us choose to mock rather than acknowledge, let alone address the social ills NYC faces.

A young man has chosen to teach a recently unemployed homeless man how to code (more like the homeless man chose to learn how to code, rather than receive a monetary donation). The student’s name is “Journeyman” Leo, he’s been learning to code since late August, and he was arrested Sunday morning by the NYPD for trespassing in a City park (sleeping on a bench past park closing hours), although today he’s free.

The arrest didn’t come without disruption though. In addition to whatever mental stress was incurred by going through the NYPD’s booking and holding process, Leo was unable to meet with his teacher that day and almost missed a media interview about his journey.

It might be a bit cynical to then say “digital coding couldn’t save the homeless guy from reality,” but it honestly didn’t. And the arrest, indeed “Journeyman’s” entire situation, is a sad lesson on how little education and experience helps in fighting today’s deeply entrenched metropolitan social problems….

Continue Reading

Wrote this because Journeyman’s situation so recently proves how vital social mobility is to success.

And the absence of social mobility could seriously stagnate an economy. We’re talking about “culture of despair” type of stagnation, which I’ll be writing about soon too through another story.

But if you want to renew hope for people, give them a chance to consider investing in themselves, if you want people to see themselves having a future, you need social mobility. The kind that overcomes racial and economic discrimination.

The kind that doesn’t let someone drop from a corporate job at Metlife in 2011 to living on the NYC sidewalk in 2013.

howtobeterrell:

limeshadow:

this is an example of one of the many tactics to discredit the image of conscious black people in mainstream media. making it appear crazy and buffoonish so children viewing this would run from anything that appeared remotely similar when entering adulthood. an anti-black conscious position, that transplants black conscious people as anti-intellectuals by utilizing an actual anti-intellectual approach.

Thank you

Or it’s 1990s era sitcom, and we all need to stop hoping T.V. will educate the youth.

If this scares your children away from the Black Power movement, you weren’t doing your job as a parent.

(via kamrongeorge)

Explaining to non-Black people why asking to feel a Black person’s hair is strange, at the least rude, at the worst racist, and almost never happens to people without natural hair

*Facepalm*

This really shouldn’t be that hard to explain. Who else’s hair do you ask to feel, or feel motivated to feel, that isn’t an animal?

I know there’s 400 years of slavery that we’re unique to, but that doesn’t mean it’s impossible to understand personal boundaries, or how frequently they’re broken, especially for Black women.

I’m not looking for the deracialized MLK quotes and moments today

geoffmullings:

I’ve seen quite a lot of “deracializing” of MLK through some of his more humanistic quotes in the recent past.

I’m honestly not a patron of that kind of thinking. MLK is often taught as this bastion of innocent peace that was in stark contrast to the malicious, race baiting, Black Power hungry Malcolm X. It’s forgotten that he’s said a lot directly about racism and even related topics such as what would later be called microaggression, hidden dialect, and disguised abstract liberalism. He was also much more Black Power supportive than many would like to admit.

There’s a lot of attempts to focus on the humanistic quotes over anything racial from MLK. I think it’s because an honest examination of what MLK had to say about race then, would lead us to realize how little has changed until now. There’s still deep inequalities in legal treatment of Blacks in the United States. Our schools remain heavily segregated by race, only now driven heavily by economics and structural/institutionalized division. Even with a Black President about to be inaugurated into office, the Black American Man is still more likely to end up dead or behind bars than able to achieve the American Dream in any form.

And for the most part the United States has continued to lie to itself, and become convinced that the plight of the Black American is self-administered, rather than enabled by a system that still hasn’t seriously attempted to correct the imbalances in its legal and social administration.

In the end, I really have to ask if we’ve achieved MLK’s dream, or simply are making progress toward it. I’m thankful for either though, and willing to fight to continue the latter.