Security Video Captures Argentina train crash

Ok woah woah woah. Lets take some notes here:
1) All of these pre-noted disasters occured in nations with a relatively high poverty rate.
2) Lets compare Japan’s pre-Earthquake poverty levels to N.O pre-Katrina and Haiti pre-Earthquake. You tell me who’s deeper in the shitter.
We need to get off our “Oh Japan’s culture has made them impervious to our human desires” bullshit horse. The fact is Japan has no where near as much poverty as most other nations in the world. Therefore, despite the fact that they’ve been in an over decade-long recession, they’re a LOT less likely to see a need for looting.
Also, a large amount of faith in the Japanese government probably contributes to the lack of looting. Keep in mind the people in N.O. and Haiti weren’t exactly patriots of their countries (And for good reason, since I can personally attest to the mistreatment of African Americans in the U.S., let alone in the Mississippi Delta during that).
Before we judge people for looting, take a good look at the situations they’ve been put into. And before we praise the Japanese for avoiding such behavior, take an even better look into the situation they’re in, versus other nations that have suffered similar disasters.
Smfh.
karenabad:

Why is there no looting in Japan?
In the wake of Japan’s deadly earthquake, tsunami and nuclear power  plant explosions, we have witnessed the almost indescribable chaos that  follows a disaster of this magnitude: loss of life, severe injuries,  homelessness, lack of water, food and proper medical care, the physical  destruction of towns and cities, and a growing fear of radioactive  contamination from power plants that seem beyond anyone’s ability to  control.
But one heart-wrenching byproduct of disasters like this one has been missing in Japan, and that’s looting and lawlessness.
Looting is something we see after almost every tragedy; for example:  last year’s earthquakes in Haiti and Chile, the floods in England in  2007, and of course Hurricane Katrina back in 2005. It happens when some  people who’ve seen life as they know it get tossed out the window feel  that all morality has been tossed out too. It’s survival of the fittest  and whatever you can get your hands on is yours, no matter who it  belongs to.
But that’s not happening in Japan.

Kim: Because Japanese culture, unlike all other modern cultures, is based  primarily on honor and dignity. Unlike our Katrina disaster, the  Japanese don’t see this as an opportunity to steal everything in sight.  The so-called civilized world can learn much from the stoic Japanese.
Greg in Arkansas: Two words: National pride. The people of Japan love their country and do  what is best for the nation, unlike the United States where we love our  country and do what is best for ourselves.
Natasha: The Japanese are resourceful, innovative and disciplined people with a  great sense of national pride. While they also have criminals and  felons, it is not quite in comparison to the sleaze balls we have in our  streets. It was disgusting to watch these scum bags loot stores in New  Orleans during Katrina when they should have helped their fellow  citizens in need.  While watching the devastation in Japan is heart  wrenching, it is so refreshing to see the civility of people within the  calamity they are facing.
Larry in Georgetown, Texas: Jack, I was blessed to visit Japan several years ago on business and was  told that if I lost my wallet in downtown Tokyo that the person who  found it would make it their mission to return it to me in tact. These  people are very gracious and kind.
Carol: Sociologists will tell you that the lack of looting is just the result  of large numbers of people developing a more orderly society to cope  with living in a smaller land mass. Personally, I’ve always thought it’s  because they’re a more highly evolved race.
Joy: It’s the Japanese culture - very refined, dignified, disciplined and  civilized. We should all learn from them. They’re the types of people  you help out willingly because you know that they’ll make full use of  any opportunity to get back on their feet.
Richard: I don’t really know. It would be easy to say that they are a very  homogeneous society and perhaps in a way consider each other family. In  any case they are to be applauded.

Ok woah woah woah. Lets take some notes here:

1) All of these pre-noted disasters occured in nations with a relatively high poverty rate.

2) Lets compare Japan’s pre-Earthquake poverty levels to N.O pre-Katrina and Haiti pre-Earthquake. You tell me who’s deeper in the shitter.

We need to get off our “Oh Japan’s culture has made them impervious to our human desires” bullshit horse. The fact is Japan has no where near as much poverty as most other nations in the world. Therefore, despite the fact that they’ve been in an over decade-long recession, they’re a LOT less likely to see a need for looting.

Also, a large amount of faith in the Japanese government probably contributes to the lack of looting. Keep in mind the people in N.O. and Haiti weren’t exactly patriots of their countries (And for good reason, since I can personally attest to the mistreatment of African Americans in the U.S., let alone in the Mississippi Delta during that).

Before we judge people for looting, take a good look at the situations they’ve been put into. And before we praise the Japanese for avoiding such behavior, take an even better look into the situation they’re in, versus other nations that have suffered similar disasters.

Smfh.

karenabad:

Why is there no looting in Japan?

In the wake of Japan’s deadly earthquake, tsunami and nuclear power plant explosions, we have witnessed the almost indescribable chaos that follows a disaster of this magnitude: loss of life, severe injuries, homelessness, lack of water, food and proper medical care, the physical destruction of towns and cities, and a growing fear of radioactive contamination from power plants that seem beyond anyone’s ability to control.

But one heart-wrenching byproduct of disasters like this one has been missing in Japan, and that’s looting and lawlessness.

Looting is something we see after almost every tragedy; for example: last year’s earthquakes in Haiti and Chile, the floods in England in 2007, and of course Hurricane Katrina back in 2005. It happens when some people who’ve seen life as they know it get tossed out the window feel that all morality has been tossed out too. It’s survival of the fittest and whatever you can get your hands on is yours, no matter who it belongs to.

But that’s not happening in Japan.

Kim:
Because Japanese culture, unlike all other modern cultures, is based primarily on honor and dignity. Unlike our Katrina disaster, the Japanese don’t see this as an opportunity to steal everything in sight. The so-called civilized world can learn much from the stoic Japanese.

Greg in Arkansas:
Two words: National pride. The people of Japan love their country and do what is best for the nation, unlike the United States where we love our country and do what is best for ourselves.

Natasha:
The Japanese are resourceful, innovative and disciplined people with a great sense of national pride. While they also have criminals and felons, it is not quite in comparison to the sleaze balls we have in our streets. It was disgusting to watch these scum bags loot stores in New Orleans during Katrina when they should have helped their fellow citizens in need. While watching the devastation in Japan is heart wrenching, it is so refreshing to see the civility of people within the calamity they are facing.

Larry in Georgetown, Texas:
Jack, I was blessed to visit Japan several years ago on business and was told that if I lost my wallet in downtown Tokyo that the person who found it would make it their mission to return it to me in tact. These people are very gracious and kind.

Carol:
Sociologists will tell you that the lack of looting is just the result of large numbers of people developing a more orderly society to cope with living in a smaller land mass. Personally, I’ve always thought it’s because they’re a more highly evolved race.

Joy:
It’s the Japanese culture - very refined, dignified, disciplined and civilized. We should all learn from them. They’re the types of people you help out willingly because you know that they’ll make full use of any opportunity to get back on their feet.

Richard:
I don’t really know. It would be easy to say that they are a very homogeneous society and perhaps in a way consider each other family. In any case they are to be applauded.